Island Sexual Health Society Be informed, not surprised!

Male body diagram of testes and scrotum

Testicular health is an important part of sexual health.

Testicular Self Exams

Have you ever been taught how to do a testicular exam? Many of the people we see in our education sessions and in our clinic appointments haven’t ever been told about when to start or how to do them properly.

We agree with many other organizations such as The Canadian Cancer Agency, that everyone with testicles should be familiar with the normal look and feel of their own testicles.

Doing testicular self exams (TSE) regularly is a great way to know your body and ensure you’re as healthy as possible.

Most agencies suggest that TSEs begin around the age of 15 and are done monthly. Some helpful hints about doing a testicular self exam:

  • Do your exam after a shower or bath (the muscles in the scrotum will be more relaxed when they’re warm which makes it easier and more comfortable to examine!)
  • Feel one testicle at a time using both hands to roll the testicle between your fingers (thumbs on top and fingers underneath)
  • Be gentle yet firm so you are able to feel the surface of the testicles and surrounding tissue
  • You probably will able to feel the epididymis (the tube that connects the testicles to the vas deferens) which will feel soft and rope-like and slightly tender to pressure and is found at the top of the backside of the testicle
  • One testicle is often bigger than the other (usually the right one) and this is normal
  • Testicles usually feel smooth and move freely inside the scrotum
  • If you notice any new lumps, bumps, swelling or change in size, don’t panic but make an appointment with a health care professional for follow.

Want more info on TSEs? We’re big fans of the I Heart Guts “Grab Your Gonads” poster as a teaching tool! It’s a fun way to learn more about how to take good care of your testicular health.

Contact us if you have more questions or to set up an appointment for an exam.